Employment, Residency and Jobs for Ukrainians in Canada

Employment, Residency and Jobs for Ukrainians in Canada

Craig Faucette

As the Russian invasion of Ukraine is close to entering its fourth month, more and more Ukrainians are looking to flee the conflict and resettle in welcoming countries. And, Canada is one of many countries opening its doors to Ukrainian newcomers.  As they arrive looking to create a new home, many supports are being made available, such as settlement services, housing and employment services. Our industry is also well positioned to help. The following information describes various pathways into Canada for Ukrainians and how trucking and logistics employers may be able to help.

Pathway to Canada:

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRRC) has introduced new immigration streams for Ukrainians who want to come to Canada temporarily or permanently. A Canada-Ukrainian Authorization for Emergency Travel (CUAET) has been created, which is available for those fleeing the Ukraine and their immediate family members. There are no limits to the number of Ukrainians who can apply. This will eliminate most of the usual visa requirements in order to acquire residency in a timely matter. Their stay can also be extended by two years if needed. The Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB) has made pending files a priority to renew work permits, study permits, temporary residence and proof of citizenship while Ukrainian nationals are residing in Canada. The Canadian Border Services Agency also has a temporary measure put in place (Administrative Deferral of Removals) in order to delay Ukrainian nationals, currently residing in Canada, from having to leave the country.

Family Sponsorship:

Canadian citizens and permanent residents can apply to sponsor eligible family members to come to Canada. Applications are still to be submitted through usual procedures. Applications for immediate family members will be prioritized by the IRCC through the use of a special family reunification sponsorship pathway.

For more information on the immigration process visit:

https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/immigrate-canada/ukraine-measures/cuaet.html

Employment for Ukrainian nationals in Canada:

All Ukrainians who come to Canada as part of these measures are eligible to apply for open work permits and employers will be able to hire Ukrainian nationals through the process of CUAET. Employers looking to hire Ukrainian nationals in Canada can set up an employer profile on the Government of Canada’s Job Bank website, and then create a posting and submit a form (provided by the Job Bank site) specifically designed for this purpose. Ukrainian nationals in Canada can also visit the Job Bank’s job board free of cost.

Organizations Supporting Ukrainian Refugees:

There are over 550 organizations helping refugees with settlement and integration into Canadian society.  These organizations help with settlement and adaption services such as health, housing, schooling for children, continuing education, social services, and employment services to just name a few.

Connecting and building relationships with these organizations may be a valuable link to connecting to refugees and providing an avenue for employment with your company.  The Government of Canada has a settlement services finder that refugees can use to look for services in the communities they settle in.  Employers may find the tool useful to identifying local agencies that they can reach out and partner with.

https://ircc.canada.ca/english/newcomers/services/index.asp

Jobs for Ukrainians Facebook Group:

Facebook groups have been created that aim to facilitate contact between Ukrainians arriving in Canada who are seeking employment and employers who are hiring.  This may be a potential resource to help support Ukrainian newcomers while filling some of your recruitment needs.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/331716475664506

https://www.facebook.com/groups/canadahostukrainians

https://www.facebook.com/groups/375451514101214/?multi_permalinks=413898476923184

As Ukrainians look to seek refuge or make Canada their new home, there are many opportunities for our industry to help make the process much smoother.  Offering opportunities and support to newcomers can help individuals who are fleeing incredibly difficult and traumatic circumstances while providing a head start on a new life in Canada.

Groupe Guilbault hires seven young workers thanks to Trucking HR Canada’s wage subsidy program

Groupe Guilbault hires seven young workers thanks to Trucking HR Canada's wage subsidy program

Camille Pitt is a senior human resources advisor for Groupe Guilbault, a large fleet headquartered in Quebec City. Guilbault being one of Trucking HR Canada’s (THRC) Top Fleet Employers, she takes a keen interest in the organization’s activities.

That’s how she found out about the Career ExpressWay initiative. “I saw that there was a wage subsidy that could apply to us,” Pitt says about the program that provides financial support for hiring people under the age of 30 into various positions in the trucking industry.

In Guilbault’s case, this program has helped recruit seven forklift operators and truck drivers. “For example, when we hired a forklift operator, the first $15,000 he received was reimbursed by Trucking HR Canada,” she explains.

One of the goals of the subsidy program is to improve the employment conditions of young workers. “It was either to help someone who was unemployed get back to work or to improve their salary conditions a little bit,” Pitt says, adding that the program was hassle-free to manage.

“Signing up was very, very easy. I filled out a form, talked to the people at THRC, they explained everything to me and I was enrolled. We were reimbursed every month; it was a very simple process.”

The fact that the wage subsidy program applies to all industry occupations, not just drivers, is very appropriate according to the human resources professional at Guilbault.

“There is a labour shortage in all trades,” she says, adding that when a candidate shows interest in a company, you have to be very proactive not to lose them. “When someone applies at 8:15 in the morning, if they’re called at 1:30 in the afternoon they’ve already been contacted by four or five companies. It goes really fast,” she says.

25-year old Davin Larin was hired as a truck driver through the THRC program. He now has a Class 1 driver’s license after successfully completing his training at the Charlesbourg CFTC training centre. After initially being paired with an experienced driver for training, he now does a lot of local deliveries to Guilbault customers near the Quebec City terminal.

David was exposed to the industry at a young age as his father, Benoit, has been a truck driver himself for 20 years. He even took him on a trip to Maine when he was a child.

Field experience

Yet, being in the passenger seat or in professional training is no substitute for on-the-job experience, David admits, citing reversing maneuvers, which are common in local transportation. “You do a lot more backing up on the job than you did in school,” he says.

That’s the kind of thing Pitt is referring to when she talks about being patient with younger employees, and it pays big dividends, she says.

“We can really shape them to our corporate culture; they don’t have bad habits yet. Sometimes, it’s easier to train someone who is more junior than someone who has 25 years of experience at another company because there’s nothing to undo. You just have to build,” she says.

Given the opportunity, young people hired through the Career Express Way programs can also contribute to the evolution of their company. For example, it was David’s suggestion to the health and safety manager that a checklist for hazardous materials hauling be placed in the tablets used by drivers, a suggestion that was adopted and put into practice.

The young man envisions a career in the industry, as a truck driver or perhaps even a dispatcher. “If I can advance, I will,” he says of his eventual progression within the company.

Offering young people a career path is one of the benefits that Guilbault’s senior human resources advisor sees in THRC’s wage subsidy programs.

And not just for drivers. “Forklift operators can become team leaders and eventually foremen, or they can move into office positions,” says Pitt, giving the example of the route planner occupation.

Beyond the financial support, she says the Career ExpressWay program facilitates access to a pool of younger workers, a valuable asset in an industry with an ageing workforce.

“In terms of drivers and forklift operators, it’s really the next generation that we see. If we had to do without young people, we really wouldn’t have enough employees,” she says, noting that she also sees retention benefits in hiring young workers.

“Young people often learn and adapt more easily. They have a desire to do well and improve. They’re also often more loyal to their employer because they’ve been given their first chance, trained and everything. And they’re often more comfortable with technology,” Pitt observes.

When she looks at the industry around her, she notices that the Career ExpressWay programs have created a buzz. “It’s been a pretty popular grant,” Pitt says.

One thing is for sure, Groupe Guilbault plans to continue to take advantage of the programs offered through THRC’s Career ExpressWay. “We intend to do the wage subsidy program again to hire young workers. We’re definitely going to go ahead with this one,” says the human resources professional.

Especially that “Hiring young people with little or no experience requires the cooperation of co-workers, trainers and supervisors,” Pitt says about the sense of belonging being reinforced through team work.

That’s one of the goals of Trucking HR Canada’s Career ExpressWay programs.

To learn more about the Employer Wage Support for Youth program, and how you too can benefit from this opportunity, please visit THRC Career Expressway or e-mail [email protected].

 

The Student Solution

The Student Solution

By Angela Splinter

Every sector in Canada’s economy is looking to attract and grow its labour force, which means students and young workers have lots of career choices at a pivotal time in their lives.

Amid this intense competition for talent, our industry is well-positioned to take advantage of public awareness around the importance of trucking and logistics to the economy and to leverage our labour force data which provides insight into the wide range of opportunities for young workers in our industry.

Trucking HR Canada’s labour market information shows that drivers account for 43% of the sector’s 733,000 workers, meaning we have another 57% representing all other occupations. Dispatchers, logistics coordinators, office administrators, warehouse workers, human resources, diesel technicians, accountants, the list goes on, and all are needed to keep goods moving.

Additionally, 46% of employers in trucking and logistics expect recruiting for non-driving occupations to be a challenge in the future.

Engaging the next generation

Employers looking to engage with the next generation of workers now have financial incentives that can help.

With more than 100 employers already enrolled, our Career ExpressWay program has become a popular way to attract young workers to our industry. It connects students with employers who can offer experience and a meaningful wage.

While there is a bit of administrative work to get set up, employers tell us that once they’re in and ready to go, the program runs smoothly. Many employers who start with one or two students quickly look to bring on even more.

 

Help, not hype

For starters, Career ExpressWay currently pays up to 75% of the student’s wage up to $7,500. Any full-time or part-time job that supports truck transportation is eligible, including special projects, co-ops and internships.

Post-secondary programs are seeing the benefits of what they call work-integrated learning,? where students gain experience in their field of study and can develop the soft skills needed to succeed in the workplace.

Career Expressway is a win-win-win, really. Employers get access to a pipeline of new talent; students learn about trucking and logistics while getting paid; and the industry as a whole benefits from a growing pool of interested workers.

Lets take a look at what some of our employers say about the program:

  • Students bring fresh ideas, perspectives, and new approaches to business challenges.
  • Being able to test drive a student or new grad before hiring lowers our recruitment and onboarding costs.
  • We have been bringing on students through co-ops and internships and are happy to be able to benefit from the financial incentive offered (with some able to access the funds even if these placements were finished).
  • We have brought on students to help implement special projects/new initiatives with the labour costs almost fully covered.
  • Partnering with specific post-secondary programs like logistics and supply chain management is a strategic focus of our recruitment efforts. Trucking HR Canada’s Career ExpressWay is now a part of this plan.
  • Sometimes it’s easier to train someone who is more junior than someone who has 25 years of experience at another company because there’s nothing to undo”.
  • Hiring young workers enables us to shape them (new recruits) to our corporate culture; they don’t have bad habits yet.

Trucking and logistics employers talk a lot about how to showcase the many non-driving careers in our industry and make them more attractive through competitive compensation.

Career ExpressWay may be a solution that fits with your operations, too.

We are partnering with schools and other programs to help connect students with employers in our sector. If recruiting young talent is a priority for your business, and you’re interested in a way to help pay for it, reach out to us today. Contact [email protected] to learn more.

 

Career ExpressWay Success Story -Light Speed

Getting paid work experience at Light Speed with the help of Trucking HR Canada?s Career ExpressWay program

Trucking HR Canada

Through Trucking HR Canada’s Career ExpressWay Student Work Placement Program, Light Speed Logistics hired their very first co-op student. Taking advantage of a $7,500 wage subsidy – Light Speed was able to bring on an enthusiastic student, Aman Minhas, to help manage a new driver mentorship program, and Aman was given a career-defining opportunity to gain work experience within the trucking and logistics industry.

According to Rob Aronson, Programs Lead at Light Speed Logistics in Calgary, building resiliency in difficult times is the ability to focus on efficient operations and economic strategy wherever possible, including in the recruitment and hiring process.

Subsidies and grants go a long way, he says about the financial support the fleet obtained from Trucking HR Canada through the Career ExpressWay program that subsidizes work placements for students.

The new generation tends to be more entrepreneurial and innovative, so they bring that mindset which is needed for a growing company. Young people can add a lot with how they think and how they work, Aronson says.

When the employer is willing to listen to young workers and provide them with room to grow, even with little to no experience in the sector, students can positively impact the teams they work with.

Minhas says he found just that type of open-minded spirit at Light Speed. They’ll actually take feedback into consideration and make changes for the better of the program, he says about the opinions he expresses.

He’s referring to a mentorship program that the fleet recently introduced, pairing new drivers with seasoned mentors in driving teams.

Monitoring 20 driver teams

Working in the safety and compliance department, Minhas? job is to monitor about 20 of those teams daily, gathering data to help the newer drivers improve. For example, he monitors telematics portals to ensure that safety compliance is upheld. Through this compliance diligence, there is acute attention to important safety areas including speeding, hard braking and hours of service.

Then he will issue recommendations or, if necessary, warnings to the drivers. A task that is not always easy at 22 years old. There have been cases where these guys don’t take me seriously. They kind of see me like the kid,? Minhas says.

He is overcoming that challenge by taking the time to form relationships with the drivers, in a courteous atmosphere. When I’m talking to the drivers, I’m trying to be as respectful as I can be.

Minhas also has a couple of aces up his sleeve. He’s Canadian and grew up in Calgary, in an East Indian family — a background many drivers at Light Speed also share. This often helps with communications, although the young man humbly admits that his Punjabi is not as strong as his English.

He also grew up surrounded by people working in the transportation industry one of his uncles actually drives for Light Speed which gave him a good understanding of how the industry works.

But he’s still learning every day. Although I’ve been around transportation my whole life, never in a million years did I think that there would be so many rules and regulations that are in place in the logistics industry, he says.

At the same time, barriers to overcome are part of what he appreciates most in his work placement. There are always new challenges to solve on a daily basis, Minhas says.

As an employer, Aronson certainly appreciates such a positive attitude. I am impressed by his enthusiasm and how he’s really rolled up his sleeves. He’s taking it more than seriously, he says about Minhas.

Osmosis process

And that opinion is apparently shared within Light Speed’s team of directors. I think there’s that feeling of accomplishment with management, knowing that there’s this osmosis happening where all this information gets absorbed by the new generation coming into the company, Aronson adds.

Light Speed decided to repeat the work placement experience. With the incredible experience we had with Trucking HR Canada so far, we definitely know that we’re going to find every opportunity to continue in this direction and try to maximize opportunities to bring in more young people in different departments across the company,? Aronson says.

Experiences such as this one, which benefits both the employer and the student worker is the ultimate goal of the THRC’s Student Work Placement Program.

To learn more about the Student Work Placement Program, and how you too can benefit from this opportunity, please visit THRC Career Expressway or e-mail [email protected].

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5 tips to help you benefit from student workers

5 tips to help you benefit from hiring student workers

By Vincent Custode

While the driver shortage is certainly causing headaches for employers, a growing concern is the challenge trucking and logistics employers across the country are experiencing in finding workers to help with all aspects of business operations.

Our most recent labour market information shows that almost 40% of employers anticipate recruitment will be extremely or considerably challenging for non-driving occupations, and 32% believe retaining non-driving employees will be considered or extremely challenging.

As a new partner in the Government of Canada’s student work placement program our industry has an incredible opportunity to reach students to fill a variety of non-driving roles.

It is one of the most practical means yet that we have to engage and expose a new generation of workers to the vast job possibilities our industry offers.

Let?s take a look at how hiring a student through Trucking HR Canada?s Career ExpressWay program can benefit your bottom line, along with some tips for success.

Build your brand

Connecting directly with post secondary institutions and building your reputation as a great place to work can positively build your brand.? You are reaching a new group of workers, and ensuring they have a pleasant experience can help you build a new pipeline of talent.

Our industry is vast and diverse. Colleges and universities see the opportunity for meaningful, and relevant placement opportunities for their students. This program not only offers the industry a great opportunity to showcase the large range of jobs available and exposes more students to our sector the program offers employers a unique opportunity to showcase their organization, and their brand with a whole new generation of workers.

The sooner you start, the sooner you benefit

Students are currently looking for winter placements starting in January. By getting into the program now, we can work to support you in the jobs you want to post, giving you good leeway time in identifying a student that will be a good fit.

Additionally many employers who bring students for one term, look to have them on in the next. Getting in now can mean you also get a pipeline of students for summer placements.

Employers have a range of programs to draw from

Our webinar last week had us hear from both George Brown College and the University of Waterloo and the range of programs that employers can hire from is extensive. From HR , accounting, supply chain management, sales, brokerage, IT, communications, business analytics and more. And these are just two institutions that have provided examples.

The opportunities are there to bring on a student for a role that may not require a full-time job ? but can help you in running your business. This can include special projects, or seasonal job needs.

Start by building a strong partnership with one educational institution

Here we have seen employers benefit from focusing on one institution, and building a strong partnership. Once an institution is comfortable with you, and you are happy with the students that partnership can grow into more opportunities.

Financial incentives

Participating in Trucking HR Canada’s program will enable you to access up to 75% of the students wage, up to a maximum of $7,500.

Connecting students to jobs in our industry is essential ? and this program offers one of the practical means yet to help us in doing that.

Reach out to [email protected] today to learn more.

 

Investing in Youth: How Career ExpressWay can help you pay for young talent

Investing in Youth: How Career ExpressWay can help you pay for young talent

By Angela Splinter

With supply chains under so much duress, the need for workers in trucking and logistics has never been more urgent. Our industry is essential to Canada’s economic recovery, and there’s no doubt that we need to attract younger workers to help us keep up.

Trucking HR Canada’s Career ExpressWay program connects students and other young career-seekers with employers that can offer both professional work experience and a meaningful wage. We’ve introduced three new wage and training subsidy programs for 2021-22 that can help you do just that.

Let’s take a closer look:

  • $7,500 for student work placement

Our Student Work Placement Subsidy lets you access funds to recruit and hire students who are eager to develop their skills in a real-world work environment. The program pays up to 75% of the student’s wage up to $7,500.

Any full-time or part-time job that supports truck transportation is eligible, including special projects, co-ops, and internships. You may even be interested in hiring recent graduates to gauge their fit with your company these jobs qualify, too. And while trucking and logistics companies are obvious candidates for our Student Work Placement stream, so too are industry suppliers.

Every post-secondary institution in the country is looking to give its students access to paid on-the-job experiences in all areas of academic study. This is a great opportunity to showcase the many non-driving careers in our industry and to make these jobs more attractive through competitive compensation.

  • $10,000 wage support for youth

Looking to recruit young talent to your business? Our Employer Wage Support for Youth Program pays up to $10,000 in a wage subsidy for young people working in driving and non-driving positions.

This is different from the student work-placement stream in that the subsidy is geared toward workers aged 30 or younger, including those who face employment barriers due to lack of training, education, or other factors. It can be used for virtually any occupation in the trucking and logistics.

  • $10,000 youth driver training subsidy

While the industry’s need for truck drivers is obvious, the cost of driver training can be a barrier for young people who want to enter the industry.

Our Career ExpressWay program has a new injection of funding that can provide employers with up to $10,000 tuition for entry-level driver training for workers aged 30 or younger.

If ever there has been an opportunity for us to better connect youth with driving occupations, this is it.

What’s the catch?

Well, I would like to think there isn’t one.

Having said that, managing government funds means there is a bit of paperwork involved. All programs require a small investment of time in order to get approved and set up in the various program streams.

Our team is continually improving the administrative process and they are available to support you and answer any questions you may have.

The list of employers using our Career ExpressWay program is growing every day. If recruiting young talent is a priority for your business, and you’re interested in a way to help pay for it, reach out to us today to learn more.

The competition for new workers is only getting more intense. Career ExpressWay and the funding it provides may be the game-changer you need.

Four Key Takeaways from Women with Drive 2021

By: Katrina Pizzino

Trucking HR Canada?s 7th Annual Women with Drive Leadership Summit kept the international women?s day celebratory vibes of women, women leaders, and women in the industry going full speed. While the event was a little different – being the first time it was held virtually and globally, we still brought together over 200 women from the industry to connect and learn from one another.? It left delegates with the regular high dose of inspiration along with practical and insightful take-aways from a roster of formidable speakers.

The Right Honorable Micha?lle Jean, who served as Governor General of Canada from 2005 to 2010, and Halla T?masd?ttir, Icelandic businessperson and CEO of the B Team, left us with a plethora of insights.? The 2021 Women with Drive stage provided me with four key takeaways from our keynote speakers:

We are Change Makers

Micha?lle Jean trumpeted the efforts the trucking industry has put forward. She noted that we have been heralded as heroes during this time of pandemic, saying that it is time for the invisible to become visible.? She noted that front line workers and those in the trucking industry are finally getting the public attention that they deserve, claiming that it is the hard workers in our industry who have suffered an inexcusable blind spot before the pandemic; and that it is time we recognize that we offer good meaningful work for hundreds of thousands of Canadians. What we do with this new attention and praise is key. Truck drivers notably, as Jean mentions have a remarkable and unique role in that they get to see sights many of us never will. This is perhaps a potential draw for recruiters to take note of. A philanthropist at heart, she also encouraged us to leverage our reach. She earnestly reminded us that our trucks are moving billboards for cause and positivity. This is what many of our Top Fleet Employers do when participating in various charitable causes such as: Plaid for Dad, Pink for the Cure, and Art Saves Lives. ?We often forget to highlight this part of the trucking industry as an attraction ? that it is not JUST trucking, it is so much more. It is a multitude of causes and action, and ingenuity. By highlighting the change maker abilities of our sector, Jean created a powerful united feeling of potential.

Employers have an opportunity

Micha?lle Jean also reminded us that the pandemic has created an opening for us to further investigate some of our collective societal issues. Saying, ?In the same way lemon juice and a light bulb manifest invisible ink? ? the pandemic has highlighted many core societal issues including, racism, sexism, homophobia, and ageism. Thus, perhaps the pandemic has helped to dismantle many of the things that are otherwise wrong with our current society. She challenges employers to use this moment for change and examine their own diversity and inclusion policies.

 

Women belong everywhere ? including trucking

Halla T?masd?ttir reminded us of the ?inner leader? that we all have. We need to confront our imposter feelings in order to excel and believe in our capabilities. And, as women, we need to stop doubting and questioning our abilities and our right to be in certain professional spaces. Women belong everywhere ? and yes, that includes trucking. The pandemic, she noted, has brought about a time when women?s leadership is being noticed and recognized. T?masd?ttir reminded us that when women have a seat at the table, positive changes are made, and we see progress. For more women to be in leadership, young women need mentors and to see women who are succeeding at the highest levels.

No more business as usual

We may never go back to how things were before the pandemic ? and Halla highlighted that this is not necessarily a bad thing. A lot was wrong with the world before and the pandemic is causing us to question what could ultimately, be better.? Maybe Canadians can continue to honour truckers and the entire trucking industry as essential work.? Perhaps we can embrace a future when trucking is more alluring to new and young workers. And certainly, with current unemployment rates, we have the possibility to invite and welcome people into our industry more than ever before.

The trucking industry is one of change, one that appreciates inclusion and diversity, one that encourages women?s leadership, and one that is filled with Women with Drive. Women with Drive Leadership Summit thus remains an important event for the trucking industry ? because we still need and always will need, women with drive.

 

 

Understanding Canada’s Truck Driver Shortage

By: Angela Splinter

March 1, 2021

 

Is there a shortage of truck drivers in Canada? This question often sparks a heated debate?and more questions.

Is the labour market so tight right now that there are too few people to drive trucks? Are employers not doing enough to make the job attractive? With all the driver training, licensing, and safety requirements, is the bar too high for anyone to qualify?

 

They?re good questions, but whether there is a driver shortage isn?t a matter of opinion. The data provides the answer.

 

Trucking HR Canada?s Labour Market Information (LMI) provides ongoing actionable intelligence pertaining to the supply and demand of labour. Our own economist conducts regular analysis of Statistics Canada data, labour force data, our own surveys, and more, ensuring an accurate assessment of our industry?s needs.

Here is what we know:

 

  • There are nearly 20,000 vacant truck driver positions in Canada.
  • 61% of employers report they can?t find all the drivers they need.
  • 7.4% of all truck driver jobs are unfilled compared to 3.3% in other non-driver jobs.
  • The unemployment rate among truck drivers is much lower than the rest of the workforce. (6.2% for truck drivers as compared to 9.8% for the rest of the workforce). However, if every currently unemployed truck driver were hired into a vacant position, there would still be more than 11,000 unfilled jobs.

 

All economic indicators show a shortage of drivers. What there is no shortage of, however, are opinions and offers of quick fixes stemming from high-level politicians (who do not necessarily understand our industry dynamics) all the way to drivers themselves.

 

This is an ongoing, complex issue.

Truck fleets are having to adjust to freight conditions that didn?t exist 10 or 20 years ago. With e-commerce, the number of regional and local driving jobs is exploding, creating opportunities for drivers to work closer to home. Long-haul driving jobs today have a much higher vacancy rate than short-haul?9.4% compared to 5.9%.

Regulations play a role. The required use of ELDs and speed limiters means that some fleets have to add capacity in order to cover the same number of miles and maintain their service levels.

Training is an issue. Every year, about 28,000 new (inexperienced) drivers enter the industry to replace drivers who retired or otherwise left their jobs. These new workers require entry-level and specialized training before they can even start to drive independently and be ready to take the place of those experienced drivers who are leaving. This is a challenge compounded by the ?pandemic.

Of course, there are always experienced drivers who are looking for work but can?t find a job that works for them.

So yes, there?s a shortage of drivers. And changes in the economy and freight markets haven?t made things easier with the passage of time.

 

We clearly need better ways of matching up job seekers, both new and experienced, with available work. Up-to-date and accurate LMI data, like the kind provided in this article, can go a long way toward creating a common understanding of the imbalances between the supply and demand for workers.

 

Trucking HR Canada is committed to monitoring and providing access to these important indicators as we support the development of evidence-based solutions to our industry?s challenges.

 

I invite you to use the resources on our site to help manage the pressure you may be feeling as you look for drivers. If you have questions, please reach out to [email protected] to learn more.

 

 

Coaching through COVID-19

By: Angela Splinter

In trucking, a successful game plan for recruiting and retention includes coaching. A great coach can get the best performance out of an individual or team by providing just the right mix of guidance, instruction, and support.

Many of our Top Fleet Employers have seen the benefits of coaching programs first-hand, including higher employee retention, better workplace morale, and positive impacts on safety.

With COVID-19 presenting new challenges and changes to our workplaces, a coach or mentor can focus on ways to connect with employees who may be feeling isolated or unmotivated.

With leaner budgets, and in some cases leaner teams, having a coach can be a cost-effective way to improve morale, increase productivity, and support overall employee well-being.

Let?s take a look:

Adapting your approach

Traditionally designed to help achieve organizational goals, we?re seeing a shift in coaching to focus on the employee and their overall performance and success.

Being a coach or mentor is different from being a manager who assigns tasks and monitors the work. Coaching is simply the act of listening, asking questions, and providing feedback so employees can be their personal best. Although coaches can be external to the organization, you can look to current staff to act as coaches as well.

Coaching tends to focus on performance and short-term skills, but a coach can also be an invaluable guide for employees who are dealing with changes that may be out of their control.

Support on-boarding

Coaching is often part of an effective on-boarding process. Experienced employees, for example, can spend time with new hires and personally answer questions about company practices, safety procedures, and more.

Virtual work arrangements mean more challenges for new hires. On-boarding procedures haven?t changed much, but the experience certainly has.

First impressions matter. How you welcome new employees and bring them into your company has an enormous impact on how engaged they are and how quickly they reach their full potential and productivity.

Incorporating coaches and mentors in the onboarding process will help.

Coaching your coaches

All roles are changing as the effects of the pandemic continue. Your managers and senior executives need to be equipped with the skills needed to perform at their best, too.

This may require providing professional development to your current managers to ensure they have the knowledge and comfort level with addressing these new challenges we are facing.

Investing in your employees is always a good thing to do. As we cope with COVID-19, it is becoming simply the right thing to do if we want our teams and teammates to perform their best.

 

 

Major revisions coming to Canada’s National Occupational Classification

By: Angela Splinter

Canada is overhauling the National Occupational Classification (NOC) — the national reference on occupations in Canada.

The NOC provides a systematic classification structure that categorizes the entire range of occupational activity in Canada for collecting, analyzing, and disseminating occupational data. ?Every 10 years, the government conducts a major review of the NOC for the purposes of labour supply and demand analysis, skills development, occupational forecasting, and other programs and services.

The next release, scheduled for early 2021, includes a new structural approach.? Let?s take a look:

New ?TEER? approach

Reflecting changes in the economy and the nature of work, the?NOC 2021?revision will overhaul the “skill level” structure by introducing a new categorization representing the degree of training, education, experience, and responsibilities (TEER) required for an occupation.

The new TEER categorization considers the type of education, training, and experience required for entry, as well as the complexities and responsibilities typical of an occupation. This new structure has a scale of 0 to 5:

 

  • TEER 0 is defined as high-level management.
  • TEER 1 occupations usually require a university education or previous experience and expertise in subject matter knowledge from a related occupation found within TEER 2.
  • TEER 2 usually requires post-secondary education, apprenticeship, or occupations with supervisory or significant safety responsibilities.
  • TEER 3 occupations require less than two years of post-secondary education or on-the-job instruction.
  • TEERs 4 and 5 usually require a high-school diploma or no formal education.

 

Better representation

The federal government says the TEER system better reflects the way people develop their skills and knowledge.

The revisions introduce changes that will make the new classification system more representative, useful, and achieve a more balanced representation of occupation groupings within a given classification. It will also address many existing concerns about how skill levels are categorized under the existing system.

 

Milestone dates

With a new NOC on the way, here are some key dates to consider:

  • December 2020: Publication of the spreadsheet with the revised NOC codes.
  • Early 2021: Release of the full classification for the NOC code (including the leading statements, main duties, employment requirements, example titles, inclusions, exclusions, and additional information).
  • Spring 2022: Government programs and departments will implement the new NOC at their discretion. While Statistics Canada will implement in early 2021, Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) is planning on Spring 2022 implementation, which will impact the Temporary Foreign Worker Program.

 

At this point, we don?t know of any specific changes to NOC 7511, how truck drivers will be classified in the TEER system, or if the new classification will result in changes to affected programs.

Stay tuned. Trucking HR Canada, the Canadian Trucking Alliance, and your provincial trucking association will have updates as they become available.