Plan now for a healthy economic rebound

By: Angela Splinter

May 11, 2021

We’re all pining for post-pandemic life. As vaccine rollouts make this possible, and we fill offices, restaurants, stadiums and hotels again, Canada needs a healthy trucking and logistics industry to help carry the economy.

We’re responsible for moving more than $850 billion in goods each year and employ more than 650,000 workers. What’s more, trucking and logistics businesses support virtually every other industry in Canada, including manufacturing, construction, farming, oil and gas, forestry and more.

COVID-19 has both confirmed and emphasized that truck transportation is one of Canada’s most important commercial and economic sectors. It’s essential that we’re operating at full strength.

Labour challenges

According to our latest economic assessments and labour market information (LMI), the pandemic has only made HR management a higher priority especially when it comes to over-the-road truck drivers. Here’s what the data tells us:

  • Demand for drivers: We project truck driver vacancies in Canada to surpass 25,000 by 2023, a 25% increase compared to 2019. We expect vacancies to rise for other occupations as well. By 2023, the need for drivers is expected to be greater than our baseline pre-COVID-19 projections due to increased demand for trucking services as the economy reopens.

 

  • Demographic changes: The average worker in trucking and logistics is older than in other industries, with 27% of workers over the age of 55 compared to 21% in the general labour force. On average, 13,675 workers retire from trucking each year. Our aging workforce further fuels the labour shortage.

 

  • New entries: Workers coming into the industry are largely made up of new entries or entries from other occupations. In fact, about 54,000 inexperienced workers are expected to enter the sector each year to 2023, a signal that training needs may be significant.

 

  • Labour supply gaps remain: The supply of workers in our industry is only projected to grow by about 5,600 people per year. This net growth is a function of inflows (new entries and entries from other occupations, immigration and non-permanent residents) and outflows of workers (retirements and other attrition). Importantly, this growth will not be enough to meet the expected employment demand over the same period.

What does it all mean? We need skilled workers. How do we get there? Let’s take a look:

More financial incentives are coming. Apply now and avoid delays later

Our Career ExpressWay Program is gearing up for more wage subsidies designed to get more young people to work in our industry. The program offers financial incentives specifically for truck transportation and logistics employers. The time has never been better for us to recruit young workers. They need work, and we have work.

As with all government programs, there is some paperwork involved. Get pre-approved today and be ahead of the competition come summer. With wage subsidies ranging from $5,000 to $10,000 per young person, the extra time is worth it.

To learn more, visit our website and/or reach out to John today at [email protected].

Workplace harassment and violence requirements: Comply now so you can focus on other HR matters later

All federally regulated employers are required to comply with Canada’s new Workplace Harassment and Violence Prevention Regulations that came into force in January of this year.  Employers need to have proper policies in place, a designated recipient in place, and more.  Your entire workforce needs to complete compliant training by December 31, 2021.  All this to say, it’s a little more complicated than you may think.

As an employer, you need to:

  • Complete a risk assessment and implement preventive measures
  • Create emergency procedures to protect staff from harassment and violence
  • Prepare and communicate a compliant workplace policy
  • Be ready to receive complaints and follow the required resolution process
  • Provide information and support to targets of harassment and violence
  • Have a designated recipient who is specially trained on the regulations
  • Ensure that all managers and supervisors receive specific training given their role
  • Train all employees on the new regulations
  • Ensure your record keeping is in line with Labour Canada requirements

Our website and on-line learning centre have policy templates, how-to guides, checklists and all the on-line training resources you need. Our resources are free and the training is cost effective. Developed in partnership with Labour Canada, the Canadian Trucking Alliance and all provincial associations, employment lawyers, labour representatives and more, Trucking HR Canada has you covered. Feel to reach out to Michella today at [email protected].

Top Fleet Employers

Our Top Fleet Employers are leaders in promoting a positive image of trucking and logistics and offering great places to work. We are proud to see this program grow each year, with 77 fleets recognized this year.

Stay tuned for our 2021 best practices report that will showcase recruitment and retention initiatives that work for our Top Fleets, which means they may work for you, too.  And if you are a leader in terms of your HR approaches, contact us today to learn how you can be recognized while also accessing many other program perks, including pre-approval for wage subsidies.

Feel free to reach out to Alero at [email protected].

We all want our industry’s employees and businesses to be in good health physically, mentally and financially. Canada’s economy needs us more than ever.

Taking some of these steps today will help get your business on track.